Blog Post

Supreme Court Ruling on Cell Phone Privacy: Encouraging for Privacy

At the end of its 2013-14 session, the Supreme Court stood up for privacy in a case involving cell phones. In Riley v. California, the Court held that the police cannot search a cell phone’s contents incident to an arrest without a search warrant. As a result of this ruling, when the police arrest someone, perhaps for a traffic violation, a misdemeanor, or even a serious crime, all information in a cell phone should not be automatically accessible to the police without any further review. Police must obtain a search warrant.

WPF’s Top Ten Opt-Out List is Freshly Updated

We have updated our popular Top Ten Opt Out list with new links and additional information. From key data brokers to credit cards, If you are wondering where to start to get off of lists and whisk your sensitive information out of circulation, we have distilled the most important opt outs to a manageable size. We have included the key opt outs that we ourselves practice with links and tips.

India Update: Talk, National Law University, New Delhi India

I was honored to address students at the National Law University, Delhi this past week about privacy in the US and global privacy trends and issues. The talk included a Q and A session, during which the students engaged in a spirited conversation about US policies regarding surveillance and privacy. I enjoyed the session thoroughly. The students asked challenging questions in particular about telecommunications policies and the idea of safety versus privacy and achieving proper balance.

Big Data, Big Myths

  WPF Blog Post   Forbes has published a thoughtful article about Big Data, reeling the hype attached to the catchy term back to reality. The article, written by Forbes contributors Woodrow Hartzog and Evan Selinger, outlines why the term Big Data isn’t used by people who actually work in Big Data. The article meanders

WPF files comments on Genomic Data Sharing, urges broad privacy protections

WPF filed comments today asking The National Institutes of Health to make changes to its draft Genomic Data Sharing Policy for sharing, for research purposes, of large-scale human and nonhuman genomic data. The World Privacy Forum comments focus on human genomic privacy. “We are most concerned in our comments that the NIH find a full range of privacy protections for genomic data to be used for research. We are interested in a full arsenal from encryption to certificates of confidential to civil and criminal penalties for misuse. Consent — as alluring as the idea is — cannot by itself carry all of the privacy water,” said Pam Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum.