Consumer Privacy

Public Comments: January 2012 – Regarding Face Facts: A Forum on Facial Recognition

The World Privacy Forum appreciates the opportunity to comment on the issue of facial recognition pursuant to the FTC Face Facts Workshop held on December 8, 2011. [1] The World Privacy Forum spoke on Panel 4 of the workshop, and those comments are already on the record. In these written comments, we would like to submit several key documents for the record and reaffirm several ideas from the workshop. The documents we are including as part of these comments include the World Privacy Forum’s groundbreaking report on digital signage, The One Way Mirror Society. Also included as part of these comments are the consensus privacy principles for digital signage installations that were signed by the leading US consumer and privacy groups.

Public Comments: December 2011 – WPF urges more consumer protection and redress in the Facebook FTC settlement

In response to the FTC’s proposed settlement with Facebook over the company’s multiple privacy violations, the World Privacy Forum has asked the FTC to make key changes. “We applaud the FTC for its work on the Facebook case,” said executive director Pam Dixon. “We support many parts of the settlement. However, we urge the FTC to provide full redress for affected consumers by rolling back the privacy controls to the 2009 defaults, and we also urge the FTC to follow the 2004 Gateway Learning, Corp. precedent and require Facebook to disgorge profits they made from violating their privacy policy retroactively.” The comment period is open to the public until December 30.

Report: Many Failures: A Brief History of Privacy Self-Regulation | Section: Government Privacy Self-Regulatory Activities

This section reviews several other privacy self-regulatory activities that share some characteristics with the industry self-regulatory programs discussed above, but these activities differ in various ways. The most noticeable differences are the role of the government in the programs. The Department of Commerce is involved in the Safe Harbor Framework, and the Federal Trade Commission is involved in the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.