Future of Privacy

One-Way-Mirror Society: Recommendations

There is no public awareness of the capabilities of digital signage, and that has to change before for any debate over regulation or legislation can start. Nevertheless, it is possible to identify from other privacy arenas the types of standards that should be considered for users of digital signage. Full recommendations will only be possible at a later stage. Here are some preliminary ideas.

One-Way-Mirror Society: Conclusion

New forms of sophisticated digital sign networks are being deployed widely by retailers and others in both public and private spaces. Few consumers, legislators, regulators, or policy makers are aware of the capabilities of digital signs or of the extent of their use. The technology presents new problems and highlights old conflicts about privacy, public spaces, and the need for a meaningful debate. The privacy problems inherent in digital networks are profound, and to date these issues have not been adequately addressed by anyone.

One-Way-Mirror Society: Appendix A – POPAI Recommended Code of Conduct for Consumer Tracking Methods

The following document is the recommended code of conduct for businesses engaging in consumer tracking. The document is entirely non-binding, and was created entirely by industry participants. The document is reproduced here in full with no changes.

Best Practices: Recommended Code of Conduct for Consumer Tracking Methods

Keep my genes private: World Congress panel presentation

Genetic privacy — The World Privacy Forum presented a talk at the World Congress in Washington D.C. today on the intersection between genetic privacy and marketing, and on genetic issues and medical identity theft. The presentation exposed the list marketing activities surrounding health care data, and examined how the current loopholes in the recently passed Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) would not necessarily ease issues with incidental collection and use of genetic information.