Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA)

Genetic regulations and privacy: Department of Labor

Genetic privacy — The World Privacy Forum filed comments today with the Department of Labor requesting that the DOL expand its protections of how genetic information may be used by health insurance companies or group health plans. The World Privacy Forum urged the DOL to include genetic information posted on social networking sites in its consideration of the GINA regulations.

World Privacy Forum comments on genetic non-discrimination to HHS

Genetic non-discrimination regulations (GINA) — The World Privacy Forum filed comments on proposed regulations for implementing Title I of GINA, the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act. The WPF requested a change to the proposed regulations, asking the Department of Health and Human Services require immediate posting of revised notices of privacy practices on the web sites of affected health plans. Under the proposed regulations, written notice of revised privacy practices to individuals could be delayed due to the cost of postal mailing. The WPF noted that a revised privacy notice posted on a health plan’s web site would not incur postal costs, and that regulated entities should take this minimum step to inform consumers of any changes regarding privacy practices affecting genetic non-discrimination.

World Privacy Forum files comments on proposed genetic discrimination regulations

Genetic Privacy | GINA — The World Privacy Forum filed comments on the proposed regulations on the Genetic Information NonDiscrimination Act, or GINA. The comments request that the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission close down several potential loopholes in consumer protection in the proposed regulations. The Forum specifically asked the EEOC to consider curtailing the amount of commercially available information employers could access about employees, for example, through marketing databases. WPF also requested that those covered under GINA be required to maintain audit trails in certain circumstances, and urged that wellness programs be structured in such a way so as to prevent information leakage through billing and other activities.

World Privacy Forum urges more clarification and privacy protection regarding “incidental collection” of genetic information in GINA

GINA – Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act — In comments regarding the recently passed GINA (Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act), the World Privacy Forum said that some aspects of GINA need clarification to enhance privacy. The comments focus on a number of privacy issues the RFI raised, including model privacy notices and the issue of what the GINA statute calls “incidental collection” of genetic information. Currently, GINA states that some kinds of information are exempted from being considered as regulated for medical underwriting purposes. For example, medical information gleaned about patients for underwriting purposes from medical databases is regulated. But medical information gleaned about patients for underwriting purposes from, for example, marketing lists containing robust patient information may be unregulated if the law is not clarified in the regulatory process. The World Privacy Forum urged HHS and the Department of Labor to substantially clarify what constitutes “incidental collection,” and urged the agencies to consider lists containing identifiable patient information to be considered in the same category as a “medical database.”

Keep my genes private: World Congress panel presentation

Genetic privacy — The World Privacy Forum presented a talk at the World Congress in Washington D.C. today on the intersection between genetic privacy and marketing, and on genetic issues and medical identity theft. The presentation exposed the list marketing activities surrounding health care data, and examined how the current loopholes in the recently passed Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) would not necessarily ease issues with incidental collection and use of genetic information.