Modern Permanent Record

The modern permanent record is a set of disparate bits of information about you that can be pieced together from online, offline, and other data sources to create a mosaic of your likes, dislikes, characteristics, finances, education, buying habits, eating habits, health conditions, and more. This mosaic can contain segments that are stubbornly difficult to remove or change; we call this the “modern permanent record.”

World Privacy Forum Announces Plans to File FTC Complaint About AOL Search Data Release

Internet privacy — The World Privacy Forum announced today that it would be filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission about the posting by AOL of a portion of its users’ search data on the Internet. While the data was not expressly identified by name, the search queries themselves included in some cases personally identifiable information such as individuals’ names, Social Security Numbers, and myriad other personal information. The World Privacy Forum urges consumers to take precautions when using search engines.

How to say no to the cookies that track you

Consumer tips on managing cookies — Some computer cookies are harmless, but others can track your moves across many Web sites, eventually building a detailed history of your preferences. The good news is that you can manage these persistent tracking cookies to some degree. To do this, you need to know how to say no to the third party tracking cookies you don’t want while still allowing yourself to say yes to the cookies you do want. There are several ways to do this. One way is to download “opt-out cookies.” Another way is to use your browser’s cookie management tools to manage your cookies. Another method is to regularly delete unwanted cookies. In some cases, you can stop tracking through account preferences at some web sites.

Inaugural World Privacy Forum Report, 11 November 2003

Job Searching in the Networked Environment: Consumer Benchmarks — The World Privacy Forum officially launches with this inaugural report, a study a year in its research on the job search sector. This study, The 2003 Job Search Privacy Study: Job Searching in the Networked Environment: Consumer Benchmarks , documents job applicant privacy across the job search industry from resume writers to job search sites to resume blasters and other parts of the job search infrastructure.

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