Patient’s Guide to HIPAA Part II: The Seven Basic Patient Rights

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: E. Right to Receive an Accounting of Disclosures (FAQ 37 – 45)

FAQ 37: What’s an Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 38: Why Should I Care about Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 39: How Do I Make a Request for an Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 40: Who Has to Provide Me with an Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 41: What does it Cost to Obtain an Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 42: What are the Limitations of an Accounting of Disclosures?
FAQ 43: Why Bother Asking for an Accounting if It Has so Many Loopholes?
FAQ 44: Do I have Greater Rights under State Laws, Other Federal Laws, or Hospital Policies?
FAQ 45: What’s the Best Strategy for Making a Request?

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: F. Right to Complain to the Secretary of HHS (FAQ 46 – 50)

FAQ 46: Can I File a Federal Complaint about a HIPAA Problem?
FAQ 47: What Information Belongs in a Complaint?
FAQ 48: Will Filing a Complaint Really Help?
FAQ 49: What Should I do if I See a Privacy Violation?
FAQ 50: Should I Worry that a Covered Entity will Retaliate if I File a Complaint?

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: What is a HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices?

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to a Notice of Privacy Practices (FAQ 13 of 65)

The rule requires each covered entity, like a hospital, to publish a notice of privacy practices. The notice describes how each entity implements the rule. Notices from different health care institutions may look similar because the rule is the same for everyone. However, each notice will have some details (procedures, addresses, etc.) that are specific to the institution. If you want to learn more about health privacy, a notice of privacy practices is a good place to start. So is this FAQ!

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: Why Are the Notices Long and Boring?

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to a Notice of Privacy Practices (FAQ 14 of 65)

One answer is that the rule is long and complicated. Another answer is that lawyers write many of the notices. Often, lawyers write like…lawyers, and the results are sometimes complete, precise, and often incomprehensible. Some privacy notices – and not just notices for health – are deliberately written to be obscure. Even other lawyers can’t understand them. Not every organization really wants you to understand or exercise your privacy rights.