Patient’s Guide to HIPAA

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: What Records Should I Ask For? The Strategy of Asking for Records.

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to Inspect and Copy Your Record (FAQ 23 of 65)

A covered entity must allow you to inspect or obtain a copy of your record. Some records can be withheld. (See the next FAQ.) Just figuring out who to ask and what to ask for can be complex. Don’t assume that you need a copy of all records from all health care providers and insurers. Obtaining your health records can be surprisingly complicated, may present some hard choices, may be expensive, will require some planning, and can take time. Managing many records from many different providers may be a challenge too. This FAQ tells you about the strategy for requesting health records.

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: What is the Right to Receive a Confidential Communication?

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to Request Confidential Communications (FAQ 25 of 65)

You have the right to ask a health care provider to communicate with you by alternative means or at alternative locations. This means, for example, that you can ask your fertility clinic not to call you at work or to send you an email notification of an appointment. You could ask your psychiatrist not to leave a message about an appointment at your home telephone voice mail. You might also ask a specialized clinic not to send you a post card reminder of your appointment but to use a closed envelope. A provider must accommodate reasonable requests. We think that all of the examples in this paragraph are generally reasonable. We also think that that asking for written communications – including bills – to be in plain envelopes with no identification of the provider in the return address is also reasonable.

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: How Do I Exercise the Right to Receive a Confidential Communication?

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to Request Confidential Communications (FAQ 26 of 65)

A provider may require you to make a written request to receive a confidential communication in writing. Read the notice of privacy practices to find out the local procedure. In a small office, an oral request may be sufficient. Still, if you orally tell the receptionist not to call you at your office, the doctor may not know about your request. A written request may be safer because it creates a formal record of the request. You should keep a copy of your written request.

Patient’s Guide to HIPAA – Basic Rights: Does the Right to Receive a Confidential Communication Apply to Health Plans?

Roadmap: Patient’s Guide to HIPAA: Part 2: Basic Patient Rights: Right to Request Confidential Communications (FAQ 27 of 65)

Yes, but the rule is a bit different. To make a request to a health plan, the individual must clearly state that the disclosure of all or part of the information could endanger the patient. The plan may require that a request contain a statement that disclosure could endanger the patient. The plan can demand a written request.