Security Freeze

WPF Resource Page: State Security Freeze Laws and General Information

A credit freeze (sometimes called a security freeze) lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. Currently, the three credit bureaus are allowing all consumers nationwide to set a security freeze for a fee. Some states have specific security freeze laws; a list of states with security freeze laws may be found below. However, even if you live in a state without a security freeze law, you can still set a security freeze.

Security Freeze update: as of November 1, security freeze now available to consumers in all states

Security Freeze update | Financial privacy — As of November 1, 2007, the ability to place a security freeze is available nationwide at the three major credit reporting bureaus. To date, 39 states and the District of Columbia have some form of security freeze law. But now, even in the states that did not pass security freeze legislation, consumers will be able to place a security freeze. A security freeze lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. A security freeze can be especially helpful to individuals who are having persistent problems with identity theft. For more information:

How to place a security freeze (credit freeze)

Security freeze | identity theft | financial privacy — A credit freeze (sometimes called a security freeze) lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. A credit freeze can be especially helpful to individuals who are having persistent problems with identity theft. If you live in a state with a security freeze law, then you may be able to place a security freeze on your files. This World Privacy Forum resource gives general background on security freezes, lists the states with security freeze laws, and links to more information for each state.