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One-Way-Mirror Society: Conclusion

New forms of sophisticated digital sign networks are being deployed widely by retailers and others in both public and private spaces. Few consumers, legislators, regulators, or policy makers are aware of the capabilities of digital signs or of the extent of their use. The technology presents new problems and highlights old conflicts about privacy, public spaces, and the need for a meaningful debate. The privacy problems inherent in digital networks are profound, and to date these issues have not been adequately addressed by anyone.

One-Way-Mirror Society: Appendix A – POPAI Recommended Code of Conduct for Consumer Tracking Methods

The following document is the recommended code of conduct for businesses engaging in consumer tracking. The document is entirely non-binding, and was created entirely by industry participants. The document is reproduced here in full with no changes.

Best Practices: Recommended Code of Conduct for Consumer Tracking Methods

Red Flag Rule: Executive Summary

Under recently issued regulations, the Federal Trade Commission requires financial institutions and creditors to develop and implement written identity theft prevention programs. The broad purpose of these Red Flag and Address Discrepancy Rules [1] is to require financial institutions and creditors to formally address the risks of identity theft and develop a mitigation plan. Health care providers can be creditors and, therefore, subject to the new rules, which were originally were scheduled to take effect on November 1, 2008. The FTC suspended enforcement until November 1, 2009. [2]

Red Flag Rule: Background

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) as amended in 2003 requires the Federal Trade Commission and bank regulatory agencies to issue joint regulations and guidelines regarding the detection, prevention, and mitigation of identity theft. The requirement includes special regulations directing debit and credit card issuers to validate notifications of changes of address under certain circumstances. 15 U.S.C. § 1681m(e). Another FCRA amendment calls for additional joint regulations offering guidance regarding reasonable policies and procedures that a user of a consumer report (e.g., a credit grantor) should employ when the user receives a Notice of Address Discrepancy. 15 U.S.C. § 1681c(h).