Credit Bureau

Public Comments: January 2012 – Regarding Disclosure of Certain Credit Card Complaint Data

The World Privacy Forum appreciates the opportunity to submit comments to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) proposed policy statement about the CFPB’s proactive disclosure of credit card complaint data. The proposed statement appeared in the Federal Register on December 8, 2011 at 76 Federal Register 76628, http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR- 2011-12-08/pdf/2011-31153.pdf and at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/12/08/2011-31153/disclosure-of-certain-credit- card-complaint-data.

WPF asks Treasury to get consumers’ consent before checking their credit reports

Financial privacy – Privacy Act — The World Privacy Forum filed comments today urging the U.S. Treasury Department to obtain consumers’ consent before checking their credit reports. Consumers who participate in the government’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) — an Obama administration program created to help consumers renegotiate their mortgages so they can keep their homes — must allow the Federal Government to check their credit reports without first obtaining consent. This procedure sets a negative precedent, and is at odds with consumer expectations of privacy. The Treasury gave itself this power in an obscure set of “Routine Uses” in a Privacy Act notice published along with the proposed system of records for the program. The World Privacy Forum has objected to this, and has filed detailed comments with the Treasury about the lack of consumer consent. The public comment period on this program is open until September 4, 2009.

Public Comments: August 2009 – WPF asks Treasury to get consumers’ consent before checking their credit reports

The World Privacy Forum filed comments today urging the U.S. Treasury Department to obtain consumers’ consent before checking their credit reports. Consumers who participate in the government’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) — an Obama administration program created to help consumers renegotiate their mortgages so they can keep their homes — must allow the Federal Government to check their credit reports without first obtaining consent. This procedure sets a negative precedent, and is at odds with consumer expectations of privacy. The Treasury gave itself this power in an obscure set of “Routine Uses” in a Privacy Act notice published along with the proposed system of records for the program. The World Privacy Forum has objected to this, and has filed detailed comments with the Treasury about the lack of consumer consent. The public comment period on this program is open until September 4, 2009.

Security Freeze update: as of November 1, security freeze now available to consumers in all states

Security Freeze update | Financial privacy — As of November 1, 2007, the ability to place a security freeze is available nationwide at the three major credit reporting bureaus. To date, 39 states and the District of Columbia have some form of security freeze law. But now, even in the states that did not pass security freeze legislation, consumers will be able to place a security freeze. A security freeze lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. A security freeze can be especially helpful to individuals who are having persistent problems with identity theft. For more information: