Financial Privacy | Public Comments: WPF urges caution in creating new unique mortgage identifier number

WPF submits comments to CFPB about the Universal Mortgage Identifier number and Home Mortgage Disclosure Act The World Privacy Forum has recommended privacy controls for a proposed Universal Home Mortgage Identifier number, along with other privacy protections to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in public comments on the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act. The CFPB recognizes

Public Comments: WPF files comments urging the SEC to protect asset-level data privacy of consumers

The World Privacy Forum submitted comments to the Securities and Exchange Commission today requesting that the SEC do more to protect the privacy of consumers’ asset information. Asset information — the financial information attached to mortgages, car loans, and other consumer borrowing activities– is very attractive to the consumer data industry. We would be happier with the current SEC proposal if it were practical to keep all sensitive asset-level data under the direct control of the Commission or, perhaps, the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau. Direct involvement by a federal agency, while no guarantee of a better outcome for data subjects, would provide better and clearer accountability for maintenance of the data as well as the possibility of meaningful enforcement.

Public Comments: August 2010 – WPF files comments on deeply flawed SEC plan

The World Privacy Forum filed comments today criticizing the SEC proposed regulations that would release an unprecedented amount of financial details about individual borrowers through the EDGAR database. The WPF was joined by other privacy, consumer, and human rights organizations in its comments, which focused on the privacy issues with the proposed regulations. Pam Dixon, executive director of the WPF, stated in the comments that the SEC’s new regulations would “Place on the public record and online the largest amount of personal financial information about borrowers ever disclosed, including information never before made public.” The comments also note that the SEC’s plan greatly increases the risk of identity theft for individual borrowers whose information will be released publicly.