De-Identification and reidentification

WPF to testify before Congress on data broker security

WPF Executive Director Pam Dixon will testify before the Senate Judiciary this Tuesday, Nov. 3. The hearing is on data broker security, with Chairman Flake presiding. Hearing details: Data Brokers – Is Consumers’ Information Secure? Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law Date: Tuesday, November 3, 2015 Time: 2:30 pm Location: Dirksen Senate Office Building 226 Presiding: Chairman Flake

WPF files comments on wellness programs and privacy: urges EEOC to address privacy challenges

The World Privacy Forum filed comments with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission about wellness programs and related privacy impacts to individuals. Many Americans now take part in employer wellness programs, and they are increasingly and justifiably concerned about the sensitive information these programs are gathering, sometimes in return for incentives such as discounts on pricing for health insurance. These comments to the EEOC address some of the most significant challenges individuals face, including voluntariness, fairness, due process, and information sharing outside of HIPAA.

Public comments: WPF encourages NIST to refine report on de-identification of personally identifiable information

The World Privacy Forum submitted comments today to the National Institute of Standards and Technology in response to its publication, Draft Report on De-Identification of Personally Identifiable Information (NISTIR 8053). The WPF welcomes the draft NIST report, as the area of de-identification and re-identification of personal data swirls with controversy and confusion. We see considerable value

WPF Comments about Privacy and Big Data: Ethical Framework and Rights Essential

The World Privacy Forum filed comments with the U.S. Department of Commerce in response to its Request for Comments about big data, privacy, and the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights. The White House Big Data report recognized that Big Data “raises considerable questions about how our framework for privacy protection applies in a big data ecosystem” and has the potential to “eclipse longstanding civil rights protections in how personal information is used in housing, credit, employment, health, education, and the marketplace.” This is among our concerns as well, and our comments focused on understanding big data’s benefits while drawing attention to where there are significant privacy risks that need to be addressed.