Financial Privacy

Opportunity for public comment on the accuracy of credit reports

Financial privacy | credit reports — Consumers and organizations have an opportunity to submit public comments about the accuracy and integrity of credit reports. Until February 11, the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Trade Commission and other banking agencies will be accepting comments on their draft rulemaking regarding how creditors and other furnishers provide information to consumer reporting agencies, and which types of direct disputes they must handle. This proposed rulemaking is a key one; it defines what accuracy and integrity of information provided to consumer reporting agencies means, how disputes may be handled directly with the furnishers, and which types of direct disputes furnishers may ignore. The NCLC, Consumer’s Union, and the World Privacy Forum have written a sample letter that may be downloaded and used or modified for the comments. To file your letter, submit your comments to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System by mailing the comments to regs.comments@federalreserve.gov with the subject line “Docket No. R–1300.”

Updates to Top Ten Opt-Out List

Opt-out | Financial privacy — The World Privacy Forum has updated its popular Top Ten Opt Out list to reflect several new change made to the Direct Marketing Association opt outs. In the past, some of the DMA opt-outs, like the Direct Marketing Association’s mailing preference lists, used to cost $1. That fee has now been removed for people opting out online. Please see item #3 on the Opt Out list for the complete update.

Security Freeze update: as of November 1, security freeze now available to consumers in all states

Security Freeze update | Financial privacy — As of November 1, 2007, the ability to place a security freeze is available nationwide at the three major credit reporting bureaus. To date, 39 states and the District of Columbia have some form of security freeze law. But now, even in the states that did not pass security freeze legislation, consumers will be able to place a security freeze. A security freeze lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. A security freeze can be especially helpful to individuals who are having persistent problems with identity theft. For more information:

How to place a security freeze (credit freeze)

Security freeze | identity theft | financial privacy — A credit freeze (sometimes called a security freeze) lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. A credit freeze can be especially helpful to individuals who are having persistent problems with identity theft. If you live in a state with a security freeze law, then you may be able to place a security freeze on your files. This World Privacy Forum resource gives general background on security freezes, lists the states with security freeze laws, and links to more information for each state.

President’s Identity Theft Task Force: World Privacy Forum requests that medical identity theft be added to task force agenda

Identity Theft — The World Privacy Forum filed comments and recommendations with the President’s Identity Theft Task Force. The task force’s draft report and recommendations did not include or contemplate medical identity theft solutions for victims; the WPF has requested and recommended that this be corrected. Medical identity theft victims need more help, more recourse, and agency attention.