Federal Trade Commission (FTC)

FTC Privacy Roundtable: WPF to testify on information brokers

FTC Privacy Roundtable — WPF executive director Pam Dixon will testify at the FTC Privacy Roundtable about information brokers and commercial data practices and they impact consumers. Dixon will be discussing the business models of data brokers, issues with smart grids, and opt-out problems, among other issues.

WPF files comments for FTC Roundtables on privacy standards, consumer expectations of privacy

FTC Privacy Roundtable — The World Privacy Forum filed comments last week for the FTC Privacy Roundtables, the first of which will be held December 7, 2009. The WPF comments urged the FTC to consider the Fair Credit Reporting Act as a key privacy model to apply to additional areas, to use the full version of Fair Information Practices, and discussed how a rights-based framework was the key to advancing consumers’ interests. The comments discussed list brokers at length, and explained how even the most informationally cautious consumer will land on numerous marketing lists and databases. The WPF comments noted that not all marketing lists are used to target ads to consumers; some lists and databases are used to deny consumers goods and services. The comments contain a detailed section on privacy frameworks, a section on direct marketing, and an appendix with supporting information.

Public Comments: November 2009 – WPF files comments for FTC Roundtables on privacy standards, consumer expectations of privacy

The World Privacy Forum filed comments last week for the FTC Privacy Roundtables, the first of which will be held December 7, 2009. The WPF comments urged the FTC to consider the Fair Credit Reporting Act as a key privacy model to apply to additional areas, to use the full version of Fair Information Practices, and discussed how a rights-based framework was the key to advancing consumers’ interests. The comments discussed list brokers at length, and explained how even the most informationally cautious consumer will land on numerous marketing lists and databases. The WPF comments noted that not all marketing lists are used to target ads to consumers; some lists and databases are used to deny consumers goods and services. The comments contain a detailed section on privacy frameworks, a section on direct marketing, and an appendix with supporting information.

Red Flag Rule: Executive Summary

Under recently issued regulations, the Federal Trade Commission requires financial institutions and creditors to develop and implement written identity theft prevention programs. The broad purpose of these Red Flag and Address Discrepancy Rules [1] is to require financial institutions and creditors to formally address the risks of identity theft and develop a mitigation plan. Health care providers can be creditors and, therefore, subject to the new rules, which were originally were scheduled to take effect on November 1, 2008. The FTC suspended enforcement until November 1, 2009. [2]