California consumers get new smartphone kill switch law, plus tips for iPhone users

California Governor Jerry Brown signed a new law today that requires smartphone phone manufacturers to put a “kill switch” in phones, and to turn it on by default. Lawmakers have stated that they see this as an important way to reduce smart phone crimes. For consumers, it’s a way to prevent our personal information from getting

Video: Do I have to give permission for my medical information to be in a Health Information Exchange? (Health Information Exchange Series)

This video is part 3 of a 14-part WPF video series on health privacy and health information exchanges. Many patients may be surprised to learn that a health care provider does not need your permission to share your medical information for treatment purposes within an HIE, just as a doctor does not need permission to send your records via fax to another doctor for treatment purposes. This is true even if your health record is going to a doctor you have never met before. See more ….

Freshly Updated Security Freeze Resource Page

We have updated our Resource Page on Security Freezes. A security freeze is a little-known but important tool to help fight identity theft problems. A security freeze (sometimes called a credit freeze) lets you stop the disclosure of your credit report by a credit bureau. Currently, the three credit bureaus are allowing all consumers nationwide to set a security freeze for a fee. Some state laws allow for free security freezes. More …

Consumer Alert: Significant medical data breach impacts 4.5 million patients

Community Health System suffers sophisticated attack from hackers Community Health Systems announced a serious data breach impacting 4.5 million patients across the US, spanning 28 states and covering information gathered over the past five years. The company announced the breach in its SEC filings, and described the breach as originating from China, and as an “Advanced

Video: HIE versus Fax… (Health Information Exchange Series)

This video is part 2 of a 14-part WPF video series on health privacy and health information exchanges. Doctors have been using fax machines to send and exchange patient records for years. We know that an HIE allows medical records to be shared electronically between health care providers. But how does an HIE differ — really — from faxes? What changes, beyond the obvious?