Reports

Frequently accessed WPF reports:

Analysis & Report: Redress Revisited: Has the Privacy Shield Agreement Between the U.S. and the EU Been Fatally Undermined by President Trump’s Executive Order 13768?

Report: EU-US Privacy Shield Analysis: Winners and Losers

Report: Privacy, the Precision Medicine Initiative, & the All of Us Research Program: Will Any Legal Protections Apply?

Report: The Scoring of America

Report: Data Brokers and the Federal Government

Report: Paying Out of Pocket to Protect Health Privacy – A New but Complicated HIPAA Option

Report: One Way Mirror Society

Report: Medical Identity Theft – The Information Crime that Can Kill You

Report: Many Failures – A Brief History of Privacy Self-Regulation

Report: One Way Mirror Society

Report: The US Department of Commerce and International Privacy Activities — Indifference and Neglect

Report: Personal Health Records – Why Many PHRs Threaten Privacy

Report: Privacy in the Clouds

A complete list of WPF reports is available here.

Report: The US Department of Commerce and International Privacy Activities: Indifference and Neglect

This report evaluates the US Department of Commerce’s international privacy programs, their efficacy, and their value to business and to consumers. The role of the Commerce Department has become more important in light of the Obama Administration’s establishment of a Subcommittee on Privacy and Internet Policy in October 2010. The Subcommittee is chaired jointly by the Department of Commerce and the Department of Justice, and it is intended to promote “individual privacy,” among other things. [1]

This report reviews, analyzes, and summarizes major international privacy activities of the Department of Commerce, with a focus on the Safe Harbor Framework established in 2000 with the European Union in response to the requirements of the EU Data Protection Directive. The report also considers briefly the Department’s work on the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Privacy Framework.

WPF Report: One-Way-Mirror Society – Privacy Implications of the new Digital Signage Networks

This 2010 WPF report, The One Way Mirror Society, explores new forms of sophisticated digital signage networks and their privacy implications in the US and other countries. Digital signage networks are being deployed widely by retailers and others in both public and private spaces. From simple people-counting sensors mounted on doorways to sophisticated facial recognition cameras mounted in flat video screens and end-cap displays, digital signage technologies are gathering increasing amounts of detailed information about consumers, their behaviors, and their characteristics.